Wild Garlic Onion Bhajis

Wild Garlic Onion Bhajis

Wild garlic transforms the humble onion bhaji into something extra special. Get the recipe below.

A forager’s feast!

After finally locating not one but two wild garlic patches near my house I’ve been using wild garlic in everything from pasta sauces to salads, scones and now onion bhajis! If you’ve found your way to this recipe I’m guessing you’re already hooked on the sweet subtle flavour of wild garlic. So I want dwell on how the wild garlic transforms the simple onion bhaji into a side dish fit for a forager’s feast! So why not cook up some of my other favourite Indian recipes and you’ll have a banquet ready in no time.

This recipe will make roughly 16 onion bhajis and I challenge you not to eat them at once! It took all the self control i could muster not to devour one of these tasty morsels the second the first bhaji came out of the frying pan. The smell alone was enough to lure Jon into the kitchen! He had his hand slapped a few times as he tried to sneak a bhaji when he thought I wasn’t looking. When will he learn I have eyes in the back of my head…

Wild Garlic Onion Bhajis decorated with wild garlic flowers

The recipe

These bhajis are best served still warm with a cool mint and cucumber raita.

Wild Garlic Onion Bhajis

The humble onion bhaji has been transformed by adding ribbons of wild garlic into the batter.

Course Side Dish
Cuisine Indian
Keyword beer, chickpea flour, cumin seeds, curry powder, gram flour, ground coriander, ground cumin, onion, salt, wild garlic
Servings 16 bhajis
Author Emma Walton

Ingredients

  • 100 grams chickpea flour also known as gram flour
  • 3 tsp ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1.5 tbsp medium curry powder
  • 1 handful wild garlic leaves
  • 1 large white onion
  • 100-150 millilitres beer or water
  • oil for frying

Instructions

  1. Mix together the chickpea flour and spices in a bowl.

  2. Rinse the wild garlic leaves and pat dry.

  3. Thinly slice the wild garlic and the onions and add them to the spiced chickpea flour mix.

  4. Toss the wild garlic ribbons and the sliced onion to ensure they are well coated.

  5. Slowly add the first 100ml of the beer (or water) and stir until a smooth, thick, sticky batter has formed around the wild garlic and onions. You may not need the extra 50ml of beer - use as required.

  6. Cover the bottom of a heavy bottomed sauce pan or frying pan with 1-2cm of oil.

  7. Heat the oil to roughly 165C. You can test that the oil is ready by dropping a small amount of batter into the oil - it should bubble immediately.

  8. Scoop up roughly 1 heaped tbsp of the onion bhaji mix and carefully spoon into the oil. Repeat with a few more spoonfuls, being careful not to overcrowd the pan.

  9. Let the first batch of bhajis cook for 4-5 minutes or until they are golden brown.

  10. Carefully turn the bhajis over and cook for another 4-5 minutes until golden.

  11. Remove the bhajis from the oil once cooked and drain on kitchen paper.

  12. Repeat the process until you've used all of the mix.

  13. Serve while still hot.

Recipe Notes

If you want to make the bhajis ahead of time, allow to cool completely and keep covered until required. Reheat in an oven for 15-20 minutes at 180C or until piping hot. 

Serve with



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